These vessels carry oxygenated blood quizlet

Blood is carried through the body via blood vessels. An artery is a blood vessel that carries blood away from the heart, where it branches into ever-smaller vessels. Eventually, the smallest arteries, vessels called arterioles, further branch into tiny capillaries, where nutrients and wastes are exchanged, and then combine with other vessels that exit capillaries to form venules, small blood vessels that carry blood to a vein, a larger blood vessel that returns blood to the heart.

Arteries and veins transport blood in two distinct circuits: the systemic circuit and the pulmonary circuit. The blood returned to the heart through systemic veins has less oxygen, since much of the oxygen carried by the arteries has been delivered to the cells. In contrast, in the pulmonary circuit, arteries carry blood low in oxygen exclusively to the lungs for gas exchange.

Pulmonary veins then return freshly oxygenated blood from the lungs to the heart to be pumped back out into systemic circulation. Although arteries and veins differ structurally and functionally, they share certain features.

Figure 1. The pulmonary circuit moves blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs and back to the heart. The systemic circuit moves blood from the left side of the heart to the head and body and returns it to the right side of the heart to repeat the cycle. The arrows indicate the direction of blood flow, and the colors show the relative levels of oxygen concentration. Different types of blood vessels vary slightly in their structures, but they share the same general features.

Arteries and arterioles have thicker walls than veins and venules because they are closer to the heart and receive blood that is surging at a far greater pressure Figure 2. Each type of vessel has a lumen —a hollow passageway through which blood flows. Arteries have smaller lumens than veins, a characteristic that helps to maintain the pressure of blood moving through the system. Together, their thicker walls and smaller diameters give arterial lumens a more rounded appearance in cross section than the lumens of veins.

Figure 2. By the time blood has passed through capillaries and entered venules, the pressure initially exerted upon it by heart contractions has diminished.

In other words, in comparison to arteries, venules and veins withstand a much lower pressure from the blood that flows through them. Their walls are considerably thinner and their lumens are correspondingly larger in diameter, allowing more blood to flow with less vessel resistance.

In addition, many veins of the body, particularly those of the limbs, contain valves that assist the unidirectional flow of blood toward the heart.

This is critical because blood flow becomes sluggish in the extremities, as a result of the lower pressure and the effects of gravity. The walls of arteries and veins are largely composed of living cells and their products including collagenous and elastic fibers ; the cells require nourishment and produce waste.

Further, the walls of the larger vessels are too thick for nutrients to diffuse through to all of the cells. The lower pressure within veins allows the vasa vasorum to be located closer to the lumen.

The restriction of the vasa vasorum to the outer layers of arteries is thought to be one reason that arterial diseases are more common than venous diseases, since its location makes it more difficult to nourish the cells of the arteries and remove waste products.

There are also minute nerves within the walls of both types of vessels that control the contraction and dilation of smooth muscle. These minute nerves are known as the nervi vasorum. Both arteries and veins have the same three distinct tissue layers, called tunics from the Latin term tunicafor the garments first worn by ancient Romans; the term tunic is also used for some modern garments. From the most interior layer to the outer, these tunics are the tunica intima, the tunica media, and the tunica externa.

The tunica intima also called the tunica interna is composed of epithelial and connective tissue layers. Lining the tunica intima is the specialized simple squamous epithelium called the endothelium, which is continuous throughout the entire vascular system, including the lining of the chambers of the heart.

Damage to this endothelial lining and exposure of blood to the collagenous fibers beneath is one of the primary causes of clot formation.Shared Flashcard Set. Title Anatomy. Description Anatomy-Funeral Service Compend. Total Cards Subject Anatomy. Level Professional. Create your own flash cards! Sign up here. Supporting users have an ad free experience! Flashcard Library Browse Search Browse.

Create Account. Additional Anatomy Flashcards. Term Anatomy. Definition The study of the structures of the body is Term great saphenous. Definition Which of these blood vessels is considered to be the longest vein of the body? Term superficial. Definition A term that suggests a location close to the surface of the body or a body part is Term erthrocyte, leucocyte, thrombocyte.

Definition Which of these lists include all of the basic types of blood cells? Term vomer. Definition Which os these is a bone of the face?

Term left upper, right lower, left lower. Definition Which quadrants of the body feed the left lymph duct? Term reproductive. Definition A term that identifies one of the body systems is. Term liver, stomach, spleen. Definition Which of these organs receive blood from the celiac axis artery?

Term fossa. Definition A shallow depression in a bone is referred to as a Term Bicuspid and tricuspid valve.The circulatory system is one of the primary systems of the body. Massage students and therapists need to have a good understanding of the circulatory system anatomy and physiology before taking the MBLEx.

It is also important to have a good understanding of the circulatory system because improving circulation is one of the most common claims of why massage therapy is beneficial. Sometimes called the cardiovascular system, the circulatory system is responsible for circulating blood throughout the body. It works together with other body systems to support their functions. The circulatory system can be divided into two major components: the cardiovascular system and the lymphatic system.

The MBLEx massage exam content outline lists the lymphatic system separately. So that will be discussed in a different blog post.

This post focuses primarily on the cardiovascular component of the circulatory system. The purpose of this post is to help massage students and therapists preparing for their massage exam to understand the most important features and functions of the circulatory system. The primary function of the circulatory system is to circulate blood throughout the body. As the blood circulates, it transports various substances to enable the rest of the body to functions properly.

This circulation of blood helps to maintain homeostasis. Blood circulates to and from the lungs in a process called pulmonary circulation. The blood is pumped out through the right ventricle to the lungs, and returned to the left atrium of the heart. This process works with the respiratory system to get rid of carbon dioxide CO2 and pick up oxygen O2 at the alveoli. In systemic circulation, CO2 and waste products are picked up from the cells of the bodies and later removed or recycled.

The transfer of these substances occurs at the capillaries.

How Does Blood Flow Through Your Body

The core components of the circulatory system that performs these functions are the heart, vessels, and blood. The heart muscle, or myocardium, is the engine that runs the circulatory system. An adult heart weighs about ounces and is about the size of two adult hands clasped together. It is positioned between, and in front of the 2 lungs, slightly to the left side. It beats abouttimes per day, based on an average heart rate of 70 beats per minute.

The human heart consists of 4 chambers. The superior two chambers are called atria, and the inferior two chambers are called ventricles.Which chambers of the heart contain deoxygenated blood?

The right and left atria are the top chambers of the heart and receive blood into the heart. The right atrium receives deoxygenated blood from systemic circulation and the left atrium receives oxygenated blood from pulmonary circulation. See Full Answer. Which artery carries deoxygenated blood? The Pulmonary artery takes deoxygenated blood from the right side of the heart to pick up oxygen in the lungs. Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the tissues, except for pulmonary arteries, which carry blood to the lungs for oxygenation usually veins carry deoxygenated blood to the heart but the pulmonary veins carry oxygenated blood as well.

Veins are blood vessels that carry blood toward the heart. Most veins carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues back to the heart; exceptions are the pulmonary and umbilical veins, both of which carry oxygenated blood to the heart.

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In contrast to veins, arteries carry blood away from the heart. The blood vessel that carries oxygen - rich blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.

The right upper chamber of the heart. It pumps the blood into the pulmonary artery. A large vein that carries oxygen - poor blood to the right atrium from the upper parts of the body. Which vessels contain deoxygenated blood? The inferior vena cava carries Veins carry the deoxygenated blood from different parts of the body to the heart. Among the veinsonly pulmonary vein carries oxygenated blood from lungs to left atrium.

Among the 5 main vessels of our body, veins carry deoxygenated blood. Answer: The Pulmonary Artery carries deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs and when the Pulmonary Vein carries oxygenated blood from the lungs back to the heart.

Deoxygenated blood is then pumped by the right ventricle to the lungs via the pulmonary artery which is divided in two branches, left and right to the left and right lungs respectively. Blood is oxygenated in the lungs and returns to the left atrium through the pulmonary veins. Arteries carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the tissues, except for pulmonary arterieswhich carry blood to the lungs for oxygenation usually veins carry deoxygenated blood to the heart but the pulmonary veins carry oxygenated blood as well.

There are two types of unique arteries.The left and right pulmonary arteries extend to the left lung and right lung. The pulmonary arteries are unique in that unlike most arteries which carry oxygenated blood to other parts of the body, the pulmonary arteries carry de-oxygenated blood to the lungs.

The heart is located in the thoracic chest cavity in a central compartment of the cavity known as the mediastinum. It is situated between the left and right lungs in the chest cavity. The heart is divided into upper and lower chambers called atria upper and ventricles lower. These chambers function to collect blood returning to the heart from circulation and to pump blood out of the heart.

The heart is a major structure of the cardiovascular system as it serves to drive blood to all the cells of the body. Blood is circulated along a pulmonary circuit and a systemic circuit. The pulmonary circuit involves the transport of blood between the heart and lungs, while the systemic circuit involves blood circulation between the heart and the rest of the body.

these vessels carry oxygenated blood quizlet

From there, blood is pumped out of the right ventricle to the main pulmonary artery and on to the left and right pulmonary arteries. These arteries send blood to the lungs. After picking up oxygen in the lungs, blood is returned to the left atrium of the heart via the pulmonary veins. From the left atrium, blood is pumped to the left ventricle and then out to the aorta. The aorta supplies blood for systemic circulation. The main pulmonary artery or pulmonary trunk is a part of the pulmonary circuit.

It is a large artery and one of the three major blood vessels that extend from the heart. The other major vessels include the aorta and vena cavae.

The pulmonary trunk is connected to the right ventricle of the heart and receives oxygen-poor blood. The pulmonary valvelocated near the opening of the pulmonary trunk, prevents blood from flowing back into the right ventricle. Blood is conveyed from the pulmonary trunk to the left and right pulmonary arteries. The main pulmonary artery extends from the heart and branches into a right vessel and a left vessel.

The pulmonary arteries function to deliver blood to the lungs to acquire oxygen.To login with Google, please enable popups. Sign up.

these vessels carry oxygenated blood quizlet

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these vessels carry oxygenated blood quizlet

Chapter Edit a Copy. Study these flashcards. Henry L. Which function does the circulatory system share with the heart? What is the order of the blood vessels that a red blood cell would pass through as the blood leaves the heart, travels to a tissue, and then returns to the heart? Which of the following enhances the exchange between capillary walls and the interstitial spaces? Which of the following is NOT a pericapillary cell found in capillaries?

Which of the following organs would be most likely to contain fenestrated capillaries? Which type of capillaries have large fenestrae and are found in endocrine glands? Which type of capillary has the largest diameter?

For an artery and vein of the same diameter, the vein would have a thicker wall. Veins contain valves and arteries do not. Blood pressure is lower in arteries than in veins.Shark Lab.

Return to Laboratory Exercise. Click on any photograph for an enlarged view in a separate window. Circulatory Anatomy of the Dogfish Shark Examine the bottom view photographs of the skinned spiny dogfish shark by clicking the blue lettered links in the column to the right. The specimen in the photographs was prepared by removing the skin and the ventral musculature over the pericardial cavity.

A membrane was removed to expose the heart and some of its major blood vessels. The pericardial cavity is the upper portion of the body cavity. It is much smaller than the lower cavity, which contains the digestive organs. The pericardial cavity is located anterior to the transverse septum and contains the heart and the major blood vessels leading to and from the heart. The pericardium is the membrane lining the inner walls of the pericardial cavity. Shark Pericardial Cavity.

Labeled Pericardial Cavity Examine the photographs of the shark's heart by clicking the blue lettered links in the column to the right. The ventricle is the thick muscular walled cavity that pumps blood through the conus arteriosus to the gills and the body. The conus arteriosis contains a series of semilunar valves that direct the blood flow. The atrium is thin-walled with two lateral bulging lobes. It pumps blood to the dorsal ventricle. Labeled Heart Examine the bottom view photographs of the shark's heart and cardinal sinuses by clicking the blue lettered links in the column to the right.

Blood enters the heart through the sinus venosus which drains into the atrium. The posterior cardinal sinuses receive blood from the posterior parts of the body and drain through the common cardinal veins into the sinus venosus. Labeled Sinuses Examine the photographs of the shark's ventral aorta by clicking the blue lettered links in the column to the right. The specimen in the photographs was prepared by removing the ventral hypobranchial muscles and connective tissues until reaching the lower jaw.

The conus arteriosus was traced anteriorly following the major branching blood vessels. The anterior end of the conus arteriosus continues foward as the ventral aorta. It gives off five pairs of afferent branchial arteries which carry deoxygenated blood from the heart to the gills. The afferent branchial arteries pass laterally from the medial ventral aorta carrying deoxygenated blood to the gills.

These afferent vessels enter the interbranchial bars and serve the holobranchs of the gill arches. Labelled Ventral Aorta Examine the photographs of the male shark's efferent branchial arteries by clicking the blue lettered links in the column to the right.

Which blood vessels carry blood that is rich in oxygen from the lungs back to the heart ? - Health